8 SIGNS YOU’VE NEVER EATEN REAL MEXICAN FOOD

Always good food on the malecon. 50 pesos.

Always good food on the malecon. 50 pesos.

This article is so true, the majority of the folks in the USA and Canada have no idea what really is considered Mexican food down here.  When I first got here I was surprised at the vast difference in what is Mexican food here and what is perceived as Mexican food in the USA.  When I lived in Greenville, South Carolina I used to go to the Mexican restaurants a lot and I would drive through Taco Bell sometimes to pick up crunchy tacos and burritos for a quick meal.  I  always liked what I thought at the time was authenic Mexican food.  I really had no clue about Mexican cuisine until I worked with some Mexicans at the Hot Dog King with my friend Gerald Brown.

A couple of guys that worked in the back were from Veracruz, Mexico and they kind of turned me on the real Mexican food.  I would trade them cheeseburgers and french fries for food that their wives cooked for them at home.  I got exposed to mole, pico de gallo, empanadas, and other true Mexican dishes.

So when I washed up on the old shores of Mexico, I thought I knew what real Mexican food was, well I was wrong.  I eat most of my meals out because of my work schedule, so I eat a lot of local Mexican food.  There are several ladies around town that cook meals for me and others and they cook basic Mexican cuisine.  They prepare different dishes like, chicken mole, chicken in green sauce, pozole, chicken soup with vegatables, and many other authenic dishes. And guess what, none of these dishes come with sour cream.  In fact the whole time I have been  in Mexico have I ever seen sour cream in any of the local places I eat at.

food 001

Another thing I have come to find out about local Mexican food is, they use every part of the pig, cow, chicken, and fish in the dishes.  Fried chicken feet are popular here.  When you get fish soup, the whole fish is in the soup, eyes and all.

Fresh fish meal on malecon.

Fresh fish meal on malecon.

Last year I met a couple from the USA on the malecon, and they both taught at Temple University and were in Mahahual on vacation.  One day I ran into them, and the woman told me she had just had the best tacos of her life here on the malecon.  I said where did you get them and she pointed to a guy with bicycle kind of taco cart on the malecon.  Well I know this guy who sells the tacos pretty well, and he is a local fixture here. So I asked the lady if she really knew what kind of tacos she had.  She said all I know is they great, and he told me they were “Cabeza de Res” tacos.  I told her what she had just had was “cow brain” tacos.  She then said, “Oh my God I am going to get mad cow disease.”  I told her she would be fine that all the locals eat them, and they are fine.  So I give her some advice and told her in the future always ask what you getting before you order because sometimes you may be surprised what is in it, because I have been many times myself.  After I told her I kind of wish I had not,  because she was probably better off not knowing.

Fresh lobster

Fresh lobster

And as far as hot sauce, I have learned every place has their own different kind of hot sauce, so always sample with your finger or test it before you put on your food.  I have ruined many a meal by putting on some local salsa and come to find out it is way to hot for me,

So I hope you enjoy the article below, it is from http://www.matadornetwork.com a website about Mexico that is English.

Conch.

Conch.

Cerviche.

Cerviche.

 

1. You have no idea what a real taco is.

If you’re about to try a taco in Mexico for the first time, please erase everything you think you know about a taco. Other than the word “taco,” there’s not much else in common between a Mexican taco and an American or international one.

First off, you probably think tacos have the following ingredients: sour cream, cheddar cheese, flour tortilla (or corn shell), and lettuce. Wrong. In Mexico, it’s practically impossible to find a self-respecting taco stand that would allow these ingredients to be put together.

2. You’re imagining “big-ass burritos.”

Negative on the boot-sized Chipotle-style burrito, although you can find something of similar size in Baja: a plethora of meat, veggie, and salsa options added to a massive baked potato.

3. You’ve never heard of mole, pozole, blue-corn tortillas, elote, esquite, chiles en nogada, chicharrón en chile verde, tacos al pastor, alambre, gringa, atole, champurrado…the list goes on.

More like this: 11 signs you were raised by a Mexican mom
None of the above-mentioned dishes are easily found outside of Mexico, but they are some of the most popular things Mexican people eat. So as you venture into various eateries around the country, be open to the possibility of eating something you’ve never heard of, seen, or tasted before in your life.

4. You’re expecting flour tortillas.

Although flour tortillas are relatively popular in northern Mexico and sometimes used to make quesadillas at suppertime around the country, they’re not featured in Mexican cuisine. To avoid disappointment when craving flour tortillas, find a restaurant that serves fresh-made corn tortillas hot off the comal.

5. You’re ready for margaritas and popping limes in your beer.

Although the world thinks of the margarita as a Mexican drink, it’s highly unlikely you’ll find one outside of the tourist destinations. And if you think Mexicans love to shove slices of lime down their beers, think again.

Sticking a foreign object into a beer is frowned upon — with the strange exception of the Michelada, wherein beer poured into a salt-rimmed glass with soy sauce, tamarind paste, clam juice, chili powder, lime juice, etc is somehow okay. Go figure.

6. You’re expecting Tex-Mex guacamole.

Don’t expect to find the chunky, pureed guacamole you’re used to seeing everywhere in the States. Many places don’t even serve the heavenly dip, while others mix it with green salsa, making a soupy guacamole with strong lime and tomatillo flavors and less emphasis on the avocado.

 

 

7. You have no context when it comes to chili content.

Many salsas in Mexico have a chili content that makes typical American / international-Mexican-restaurant-style salsa look like tomato sauce.

8. You fail to grasp the power of the tamal.

When you see doñas with buckets of tamales, you’re not seeing just another street vendor, but the product of half a day’s work (or more) tending a fire, shaping corn masa in husks, adding chicken mole, or beans, or chapil leaves, or sweet elote. And then boiling them for hours.

On days when it’s so hot you have no appetite, unwrapping a few steaming tamales can literally save your life. That’s how good they are.

Thanks for reading,

Stewart Rogers USA-South Carolina

A Gringo’s Guide to Being on Time in Mexico

Someone sent this article to me yesterday.  I think this article is so true.  I have had some experiences like this myself.

My quiet reading spot on the beach.

My quiet reading spot on the beach.

A Gringo’s Guide to Being on Time in Mexico

Arriving at social gatherings in Mexico is a true art form. For Mexicans, it comes naturally. They know exactly when to show up for parties, coffee dates, dinners, etc without offending anyone or being offended by others.

For expats, we need a few years of careful cultural study before we finally stop checking our watches in annoyance every time we plan a meetup at Sanborns. When an American says a party starts at 7pm, you can be sure that all guests will be there at 7pm (and leaving at 9pm haha). In Mexico, parties start whenever and end some time before everyone has to go to work the next morning.

Hopefully I can help you jump ahead in your quest to being on time in Mexico by laying out what I’ve learned as an American in Mexico over the past 9 years.

1. One-on-one

So you’re in Mexico, and you’ve agreed to meet someone for coffee, or maybe a late dinner. If you made these plans more than one day in advance, I’m sorry to tell you that your plans do not exist. It’s useful to check ahead to make sure the other person doesn’t already have plans for that time, but your plans aren’t official until you call or text them the day of the meeting to confirm. Here’s how to do it:

Step 1: Tell the person you would like to meet up with them the following day. Mention the general time (morning, lunch, dinner, night, etc), but don’t bother with an actual time just yet.

Step 2: The morning of said meeting, text or call the person with something along the lines of, “Good morning! Can you still meet me today? Does 8pm at Sanborns sound good?”

Step 3: Now we’re getting into expert level. This is my secret to saving yourself a lot of headache… Text the person 30 minutes before the scheduled time with something like, “Getting ready now! See you in half an hour. Can’t wait!” This will help ensure they don’t forget or back out. It also gives them an opening to let you know if they will be late.

Step 4: Arrive 10 minutes later than whatever time they plan to arrive. It’s ok because they will be 15 minutes late.

Step 5: If for some reason you arrive after the other person, even if it’s 30 seconds after, you have to give a lame excuse. You can just quickly say, “Sorry, traffic was bad” or whatever you want, but you have to give some reason. Otherwise it would be awkward. I don’t know why. It’s just what you do.

2. Small groups of friends

The lead-up to plans with groups of 3 – 10 friends is the same as with a one-on-one. (Confirm the day of, etc.) However, things get a little tricky because the time is likely to be pushed back further and further the closer you get. With modern technology, I recommend a text chat group with this group of friends so you can get a play-by-play. Be ready to leave your house at the set time. If you planned to meet somewhere at 8pm, that’s the time you should be putting your shoes on to leave. BUT… don’t actually leave your house until you get a text from someone saying, “Ok I’m here. Where are you guys?” This way, you won’t be the first to arrive, but you won’t be the last, either.

3. House parties

If you show up within 30 minutes of a Mexican party’s scheduled start time, congratulations: you have just earned a spot on the planning committee. If you’re a family member of the host, you’ll be asked to run to Walmart to pick up soda, paper plates and tortilla chips. If you’re not a family member, you will have to help set up chairs and tables, then sit around in awkward silence waiting for everyone else to arrive. I try to arrive 1 hour after the scheduled time. That way you’re not the first person to arrive, but you’ve still made it in time to score the best taco ingredients and see the piñata. If you have close friends or family attending the same party, you can always call or text them to see when they plan on being there.

Bonus tips!!

While Mexicans are rarely on time for social events, they always try to be on time for business meetings, interviews, class, doctor’s appointments, exams and movies.
Never, ever make plans with a Mexican on a Sunday. Sunday in Mexico is strictly family day, and unless they’re inviting you to their cousin’s birthday party or their nephew’s baptism party, there’s no way they’re going to make time for you.

The Mamá Factor: Even if you follow all the proper steps, keep in mind that a Mexican may still cancel on you at any time if their mom calls and asks them for something. (I’ve had friends cancel on me at the last minute to go to the grocery store with their mom… more than once.)

camera xmas to may 2014 071

This is so true, it took me awhile to understand the time concept here in Mexico.  I am an army brat, and when I grew up you were late if you were not there 5 minutes early.  Our whole lives in the USA are dictated by the clock, and being late is bad, not here it is stylish.

When I first started working at the port, if a ship was due to dock at 8am, I would show up at 10 or 15 minutes before 8.  By doing that I was always the first one to work, and I used to have to sit and wait, while everybody else showed up 15 or 20 minutes after 8.  I would sit and watch how almost all the Mexicans would come pouring into the port at the same time, 15 or 20 minutes after the ship docked.

It has taken me quite a while to get used time concept here.  But once you get used to it, you realize it is all relative.  Things move slow here, and no one is in a real hurry.  When I first got to Mexico, I used to get frustrated because when I went to a store to get a Coke or something it would take 10 or 15 minutes, not like in the USA where you run in and out.  Here the cashiers are in no hurry, and neither are the customers.  Now I just take my time, stand in line, and wait my turn.

It is the same if you eat out at one of the local places in Mahahual.  In the USA, we tend to run into a Burger King or McDonalds, eat and be on our way, not here. Even the fast food joints are not really that fast.  I have gotten used to it.  If I a football game coming up. or something I want to do, I go ahead and plan on taking a hour to get my food, or whatever, and plan accordingly.  I have gotten to the point I where I take my Iphone with me a lot of times, and play games and stuff while I wait.

I have a local woman I go out with sometimes in Mahahual, and I have learned that if are supposed to meet her dinner at a certain time, I don’t leave my place until the time we are supposed to meet.  I used to have to wait 20 or 30 minutes everytime we went somewhere. So I asked her one time, why don’t if you are going to be somewhere at a time, tell me to meet you 30 minutes after the time that comes up in your head, keep me from waiting.  So she looked at me and then said, “If I do that, then I will be an hour late, instead of 30 minutes late.”  So the next day we were going to meet at Papi Pizza at 8pm.  For some reason I was running late, and as I left my place at about 10 minutes after 8, I get a call from her, she is at Papi Pizza, and wants to know what is wrong, I was late, and that was not like me to be late, and she was there waiting.  Lets just say I never brought up the subject of her being late again.

We have a saying down here in Mahahual, if you plan to meet someone down here at a certain time, you always ask that person if they are not a local Mexican( usually expats), ” Is that “Gringo ” time, or Mexican time.

 

Thanks for reading,

Stewart Rogers (USA-South Carolina)

 

 

Shopping in Mahahual

I read a lot of websites and I get a lot of articles from around the Costa Maya area to try to keep up with what is going on in Mahahual and Costa Maya. I came across this artilce below from the Mayan Beach Garden monthly newsletter, and I thought I would share today.

This is a good article about everyday food shopping in Mahahual. What is good about this article , it gives a female perspective on how to shop and buy things at local grocery stores and tiendas.

I would could never have written an article like this, or even thought of this subject. I tend to look at things through a man’s eyes. I just go into a store and just grab what I need, and have never thought about some of the content in this article.

So after I read this article, I got to thinking that there are a lot of ladies and wives who read this blog and are thinking about living or retiring in the future, and would find this information helpful.

So I hope you find this article helpful, it is a kind of how-to-guide on how to shop locally.

Mini Super Noe's

Mini Super Noe’s

EDITORIAL- LEARNING TO LOVE THE MINI SUPER

HI COSTA MAYA NEIGHBORS

It is no secret — shopping in a town like Mahahual can be a challenge. There are no large grocery stores with beautiful produce and all the things you need in one place (such as a Chedraui’s). The nearest Chedraui’s is 90 km away. Most visitors to Mahahual have no idea that they can get most of the things they need in a mini-super, which at first glance, only appear to have chips and soda coolers full of drinks.

But all little towns in Mexico have little mini-supers and the average Mexican manages just fine shopping there. However, If one is not accustomed to buying their groceries in mini-supers, one might think there isn’t anything they could possibly cook with there. However, those who like an adventure, will find the challenge of shopping in a mini-super to be fun when they are empowered with the help of a few tips (which in the end all come down to Rule #1):

Rule #1 – think like a Mexican, if you want something, ASK FOR IT
The good stuff is seldom where you can see it
No one is going to say “can I help you” unless they know that you are big spender (Most of them know I own Mayan Beach Garden restaurant and they sometimes ask me if I want help, but don’t think they are rude if they don’t ask you), ASK FOR IT
They all carry more or less the same items

Few of the vendors speak English. Learn as many food words in Spanish as possible or bring a translator on your smart phone so you can ASK FOR IT.
Ask for anything you can’t find (hence the need to learn the words for foods). In a mini-super, you would normally need to ask for Avocados (Aguacates) . They may not be out in one of the bins.

Don’t feel afraid to rummage through coolers piled with unidentifiable gray plastic bags and some kind of herb (usually cilantro) rolled in paper Maseca bags. Good things are hiding in there like mushrooms, red bell peppers, poblano chilies, carrots and spinach.
The secret to buying Cilantro out of one of the rolls of brown paper is to either take the rolled up cilantro to the counter, or pull a handful of it out of the paper bag.

Don’t assume that a store only has poor looking produce. Simply ask “Hay algo mejor?” (is there anything better?) and point to the bad produce. 75% of the time it works – they disappear into a back room and show up with beautiful produce.
Don’t offend the store owner by going into the back room without asking. That would be rude. He would much rather that you ASK FOR WHAT YOU WANT

Because most of the stores are family owned and operated, you seldom receive a “NO HAY” (we don’t have it), unless they really don’t have it. But it never hurts to ask if they are sure. “La Verdad” (the truth?). Sometimes they go and check.
Always be nice. If you are rude, they will ignore your request. They hate a mad foreigner (we must remember that we are foreigners).

On the Yucatan peninsula stores are often owned by Mayan families and they don’t really like to shake your hand and they certainly don’t like to look you in the eye. If they look away when you say “Buenas Dias” they are just being polite in their culture. It isn’t being unfriendly either.
If you see a freezer chest in the store, open it. If not sometimes there is a freezer in the back with frozen meats. Ask for something “out there” and you might be surprised.

Most mini-supers carry fresher eggs than the super markets and you can buy just one egg if you want.
Enjoy the experience. You may even gain a new friend in the store owner, especially if you frequent that mini-super.
Your Costa Maya Neighbor,

Marcia Bales. . .writing this from Placer and Mayan Beach Garden Inn – 20 km north of Mahahual.

If you like this article and want to read more, you can go to, http://www.mayanbeachgarden.com/CostaMaya_Mahahual_Newsletter

I myself, because of my job and where I live, I eat out a lot, because it is almost as cheap to eat out in Mahahual for a bachelor as it is to cook, and it tends to be pretty good. I have several Mexican ladies around the village who cook for me, and it usually costs me around 40 or 50 pesos. I tend to shop at the local stores for my Coke Zero, cereal milk, water. snacks, and that is about it. So I would never have thought up the content I shared today.

All I know about shopping at the local grocery stores in Mahahual is, the people are friendly, they are patient if you don’t speak Spanish well,
they are out of toilet paper a lot, (that is something I have been trying to figure out for 3 years, where is all this toilet paper going?), and they take US dollars as well as pesos.

Thanks for reading,
Stewart Rogers USA-South Carolina

Expats in Mahahual, Mexico

Mexican Caribbean. Mahahual

Mexican Caribbean. Mahahual

 

A couple of months ago I was working at the port and it was towards the end of the day, and I was standing there watching the tourists come back to the port in their taxis, and an older gentlemen came up and stood beside me. He asked if I was an American, and I told him, yes I was from the USA. He then said, “So you are one of them expats, right?” I thought for a moment, and I said, I guess I am. He told me he had heard of people like me. He then asked me if I was hiding out, or running from something in the USA. I laughed and told him I get that question everyday from tourists, especially folks from the deep south. He asked me about living in Mexico and the Caribbean, and we talked for awhile. As he was leaving he told me he had always wanted to try the expat life, but he had kids and grandkids, and could not leave his life in the USA.

I have come to realize that there is some confusion and different opinions of what an expat is. A lot of people think expats are people kicked out of their country of orgin, or hiding out from their home country, that is not true. So today I will do my best to define what an expat is, and how Mahahual is a great place for expats from around the world.

An expatriate (sometimes shortened to expat) is a person temporarily or permanently residing in a country other than that of the person’s upbringing. The word comes from the Latin terms ex (“out of”) and patria (“country, fatherland”).

In common usage, the term is often used in the context of professionals or skilled workers sent abroad by their companies, rather than for all ‘immigrants’ or ‘migrant workers’. The differentiation found in common usage usually comes down to socio-economic factors, so skilled professionals working in another country are described as expatriates, whereas a manual labourer who has moved to another country to earn more money might be labelled an ‘immigrant’ or ‘migrant worker’.

There is no set definition and usage varies with context, for example the same person may be seen as an “expatriate” by their home country and a “migrant worker” where they work. Retirement abroad, in contrast, usually makes one an “expatriate”.

In the 19th century and early 20th century, many Americans, numbering perhaps in the thousands, were drawn to European cultural centers, especially Munich and Paris. The author Henry James, for instance, adopted England as his home while Ernest Hemingway lived in Paris.

The term ‘expatriate’ in some countries also has a legal context used for tax purposes. An expatriate living in a country can receive a favourable tax treatment. In this context a person can only be an expatriate if they move to a country other than their own to work with the intent of returning to their home country within a certain period. The number of years can vary per tax jurisdiction, but 5 years is the most commonly used maximum period. If you are not affected by taxes 3 years is normally the maximum time spent in one country.[clarification needed]

“Expatriation” may sometimes be used to mean exile or denaturalization or renunciation of allegiance. The U.S. Expatriation Act of 1868 said in its preamble, ‘the right of expatriation is a natural and inherent right of all people, indispensable to the enjoyment of the rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.’ Early Nazi Germany deprived many opponents of their citizenship, such as Albert Einstein, Oskar Maria Graf, Willy Brandt and Thomas Mann, often expatriating entire families.

Towards the end of the 20th century, the trend in expatriation was highlighted by the level of professionals being sent abroad to foreign subsidiaries and headquarters. The onset of globalisation in the latter part of the 20th century increased the need for skilled professionals overseas. If employers were not able to find the required personnel, they could turn to recruiting from abroad as intercontinental travel was now much cheaper and quicker than ever before.

Over the last decade the levels of expatriates moving abroad has increased. The level of English-speaking expatriates – with many of these coming from North American countries (including the U.S. and Canada), Middle Eastern countries, the two main Oceanic countries, Asian countries (such as Pakistan) and African countries (including South Africa) – is extremely high, with the potential to be even higher. The main factors facilitating these moves abroad are:

Work – lured by new opportunities and better financial packages
Lifestyle – a better quality of life for individuals and families; climate, value for money and experiences.
Family – moving abroad to be with family or partners
Adventure – moving abroad to experience a new lifestyle and potnetially gain a new set of skills
Although the economic downturn of 2009 has increased the pressure on expats living abroad, many still are taking the opportunity of moving to a new country or region.

It is expected that new, emerging economies will increase the level of demand for skilled overseas professionals and that English-speakers will form the majority.

There are numerous expats in Mahahual. They come from many different countries including Germany, USA, Canada, Italy, Spain, Argentina, France, England, Holland, and others. Some of the expats own businesses, and a lot are retirees. There are also a bunch of “Snow Birds” (people from North America and Europe) who spend the winters in Mahahual while their respective countries have cold weather.

A lot of the businesses in Mahahual are owned by expats. Papi Pizza, Tropicante, 40 Cannons, Mayan Beach Gardens, Under Toe Mexico, and many others. There is also several expat groups like the Las Mahahualenas ( a woman’s group of expats and locals who do charity work in Mahahual). There is also a lot of socializing amongst the expats in Mahahual, with dinners, events, and parties.

Christmas party for children of Mahahual, put on by expat woman's group.

Christmas party for children of Mahahual, put on by expat woman’s group.

Costa Maya 076 Costa Maya 073

The expatriation phenomenon in Mexico is predominantly composed of baby-boomers who are rapidly finding out retirement in the U.S. is going to be all but impossible unless you are in Bill Gates’ will. A smaller segment of the American expats in Mexico are those who work here or who have mobile enough jobs and can have a great adventure in another land while making a living via the Internet

Mexico is extremely diverse. Great weather generally, good food, low property costs, and an expanding health care industry are more reasons to retire there. A reasonably friendly populace, more readily available international products and an increasing infrastructure are other reasons.

So I hope I have informed some of you to what an expat is, and not everyone living outside the USA is a fugitive or on the lam, but are where they are by choice.

Thanks for reading,
Stewart Rogers USA-South Carolina

Mexico’s Independence Day – September 16

Today September 16, 2014 is Independence Day in Mexico. Today I thought I would give the history of Mexican independence Day.

Last night.

Last night.

In the early nineteenth century, Mexico, with a little influence from the US and France, began talking about a revolt against Spain. Father Miguel Hidalgo from Dolores, Mexico, was a leader of one of the rallying groups. Hidalgo and his officers were planning a revolt for late fall of 1810. The Spanish people found out about the revolt which led the Spanish Government to order the arrest of Hidalgo and his officers. When Hidalgo found out, he called a meeting at his church. He rang the church bell on the night of September 15, 1810 to call his congregation to mass. Here Father Hidalgo rallied the people to fight. He gave the speech which is now known as ‘Grito de Delores’, saying “Viva Mexico” and “Viva la independencia!” These famous words have been remembered and are said each year at the Independence Day celebrations.

A statue of Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla in front of the church in Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato

A statue of Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla in front of the church in Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato

This event has since assumed an almost mythic status. Since the late 20th century, Hidalgo y Costilla’s “cry of independence” has become emblematic of Mexican independence.

Each year on the night of September 15 at around eleven in the evening, the President of Mexico rings the bell of the National Palace in Mexico City. After the ringing of the bell, he repeats a shout of patriotism (a Grito Mexicano) based upon the “Grito de Dolores”, with the names of the important heroes of the Mexican War of Independence who were there on that very historical moment included, and ending with the threefold shout of ¡Viva México! from the balcony of the palace to the assembled crowd in the Plaza de la Constitución, or Zócalo, one of the largest public plazas in the world. After the shouting, he rings the bell again and waves the Flag of Mexico to the applause of the crowd, and is followed by the playing and mass singing of the Himno Nacional Mexicano, the national anthem, with a military band from the Mexican Armed Forces playing. This event draws up to half a million spectators from all over Mexico and tourists worldwide. On the morning of September 16, or Independence Day, the national military parade (the September 16 military parade) in honor of the holiday starts in the Zócalo and its outskirts, passes the Hidalgo Memorial and ends on the Paseo de la Reforma, Mexico City’s main boulevard, passing the El Ángel memorial column and other places along the way.

A similar celebration occurs in cities and towns all over Mexico, and in Mexican embassies and consulates worldwide on the 15th or the 16th. The mayor (or governor, in the case of state capitals and ambassadors or consuls in the case of overseas celebrations), rings a bell and gives the traditional words, with the names of Mexican independence heroes included, ending with the threefold shout of Viva Mexico!, the bell ringing for the second time, the waving of the Mexican flag and the mass singing of the National Anthem by everyone in attendance. There are also celebrations in schools as well all over the country. In the 19th century, it became common practice for Mexican presidents in their final year in office to re-enact the Grito in Dolores Hidalgo, rather than in the National Palace. President Calderón officiated at the Grito in Dolores Hidalgo as part of the bicentennial celebrations in 2010 on the 16th of September, even though he had to do this first, to launch the national bicentennial celebrations, in the National Palace balcony on the night of the 15th. As a result, the 2012 commemoration, his last as President, was held in the National Palace balcony instead, thus becoming the third President breaking the traditional practice.

Municipal president giving the "grito" of "¡Viva México!" at the commencement of Independence Day festivities at 11 pm 15 Sept 2008 in Ixmiquilpan, Hidalgo.

Municipal president giving the “grito” of “¡Viva México!” at the commencement of Independence Day festivities at 11 pm 15 Sept 2008 in Ixmiquilpan, Hidalgo.

The following day, September 16 is Independence Day in Mexico and is considered a patriotic holiday, or fiesta patria (literally, Patriot Festival or Civic Festival). This day is marked by parades, patriotic programs, drum and bugle and marching band competitions, and special programs on the national and local media outlets, even concerts.

Full version of the Shout of Dolores today

This is the version often recited by the President of Mexico in the national commemorative activity in the National Palace or at the church in Dolores. Local leaders can adapt this to their respective circumstances from the state to the municipal or city level.

English
Mexicans!
Long live the heroes that gave us the Fatherland (and liberty)!
Long live Hidalgo!
Long live Morelos!
Long live Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez!
Long live Allende!
Long live Galeana and the Bravos!
Long live Aldama and Matamoros!
Long live National Independence!
Long Live Mexico! Long Live Mexico! Long Live Mexico!
Spanish
¡Mexicanos!
¡Vivan los héroes que nos dieron la patria y libertad!
¡Viva Hidalgo!
¡Viva Morelos!
¡Viva Josefa Ortíz de Dominguez!
¡Viva Allende!
¡Viva Galeana y los Bravo!
¡Viva Aldama y Matamoros!
¡Viva la Independencia Nacional!
¡Viva México! ¡Viva México! ¡Viva México!

Everyone fought together, including the Criollos (wealthy Mexicans of Spanish descent), Mesizos (children born from the marriage of a Spaniard and an Indian), and Indians. Armed with clubs, knives, stone slings, and ancient guns, they fought as they marched to Mexico City. A battle took place in Guanajuato between the Spanish soldiers and Hidalgo’s followers. The army sacked the town, killing the Spaniards. They continued to fight on their way to the capital. When they finally reached Mexico City, the army hesitated before going in to fight and some of them even disserted the army. Before the year was over Father Hidalgo was captured and executed. Some people continued to fight for the cause and Father Hidalgo’s Grito de Delores (Cry of Delores) became the battle cry of the Mexican War of Independence. The people fought for eleven years before they finally won their freedom.

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Today Mexican Independence Day is a major celebration in Mexico and is bigger than Cinco de Mayo. It is celebrated with a fiesta (party). The celebrating begins on September 15 (the eve of Independence Day) where crowds of people gather in the zocalos (town meeting place) of cities, towns, and villages. In Mexico City a huge square is decorated with flags, flowers and lights of red, white, and green. People sell confetti, whistles, horns, paper-machete helmets, and toys in the colors of red, white and green. There is also plenty of feasting! When the clock strikes eleven o’clock the crowd gets silent. On the last strike of eleven the president of Mexico steps out on the palace balcony, and rings the historic liberty bell that Father Hidalgo rang to call the people. Then the president gives the Grito de Delores. He shouts “Viva Mexico” “Viva la independencia” and the crowd echoes back. People do this at the same time all across Mexico. While the crowd says this they fill the air with confetti, streamers and hoopla. Castillos explode in showers of red, white, and green.

The actual day of September 16 is similar to July Fourth in the US. There are rodeos, parades, bullfights, horseback rider performances and grand feasts. The statues in memory of Father Hidalgo are decorated with red, white, and green flowers. The Mexican Flag is made up of green, white, and red. The green is on the left side of the flag and symbolizes independence. White is the color in the middle of the flag and symbolizes religion. The red is on the right side of the flag and symbolizes union. These colors are used often in decorating for the Mexican Independence Day fiesta.

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I hope I have given you some insight in the history of Mexico.  Thanks for reading, and Viva Mexico.

Stewart Rogers USA-South Carolina

New Direct Airport Shuttle Service From Cancun To Mahahual

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New Direct Airport Shuttle Service From Cancun To Mahahual
$70 US (includes tax) per person

Departs Friday and Saturday afternoons from Cancun Airport

Returns Saturday and Sunday mornings from Mahahual

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Airport Bus Service
Sandals and Skis, in partnership with the Riviera Maya’s AGI Tours, is now the official booking
entity for a new, direct airport shuttle service to Mahahual with weekend service starting
September 26th, 2014. AGI’s fleet of vehicles range from small limos, to comfortable 16 person
passenger shuttle buses, giving our service the flexibility in vehicle sizes to accommodate all size
groups, as well as valet service for early or late arrivals. Clean, late model vehicles, with safe
and professional drivers, make the 4 hour drive a nice place to snooze, read a book or just relax
and enjoy the sites along the way.

Shuttles leave the Cancun Airport at 4:00 PM every Friday and Saturday afternoons and
travels the entire way on nice, modern and very safe roads. The first half of the trip is along a 4
lane divided highway that passes through Playa Del Carmen and on to Tulum. This is the stretch
known as the Riviera Maya and there are huge hotels and resorts all along the way.

In Tulum, about an hour and a half into the trip, the driver will stop at a large modern super
grocery/everything store for about 15 minutes. Passengers can find clean restrooms, ATMs, a
cheap and high quality pharmacy, snacks and many of those things you forgot like beach
towels, sunscreens or beach toys for the kids.

Once back on the road, the last couple hours tends to go fast, as the trip is mainly through thick Yucatan jungle. Depending on the time of year, the birds and butterflies can be dazzling and there are lots of interesting things to see along the way that will keep your attention. You will pass through tiny pueblos, the small Mayan city Felipe Carrillo Puerto, orchards of limes,
bananas and pineapples hidden in thick jungle areas, occasional beautiful “ranchos”, and even
small stick huts where people sell fruit cut and bagged for a dollar, as well as whole and by the
kilo. For those who pay attention, it is an amazing drive actually!

When you arrive in Mahahual, the bus will drop you at the downtown taxi portal, which is
required by local transportation codes, and a taxi will take you to your hotel. Most hotels in
town are either $20 or $30 pesos, about $2 or $3 dollars for the trip. If you are staying remote,
ask Sandals and Skis to get you a rate to your specific destination. The taxis in Mahahual are
very good and part of a well run local union. We encourage all to use taxis in Mahahual for
longer distances and just stroll the Malecon for the short trips. Check my blog on taxis for more
info on how they operate and a current rate sheet.

Taxi_mahahual-244x173 Taxi_Tour_Logo

For your return trip, your driver leaves from the Tropicante restaurant at 8:00 AM on
Saturdays and Sundays, and drives direct to the Cancun airport, where it arrives about 12:30.

Reservations are required and must be made through Sandals and Skis in advance. AGI Tour’s
license requires they have a roster of all passengers and Sandals and Skis must present that a day before. Payment is not required for bookings outside of 30 days prior, but must be paid within 30 days of your arrival to assure a spot. Payment must be made via Visa, Master Card or PayPal within 30 days of arrival to assure your seat. Reservations made but not paid 30
days prior can be bumped, so it is best to pay ahead once you know you are coming. Email
Sandals and Skis today to get your spot saved. If you are unsure on your travel days, ask Steve
to help you coordinate your flight with the shuttle service before you buy your plane tickets. He
knows all the transportation answers, from shuttles and buses, to boats and burros, no worry, he can get you here. Call or email.
Home Concierge Services Accommodations Transportation Tropicante Ameri-Mex Grill More About Costa Maya Cruisers For Sale Contact Us
steveuhl@sandalsandskis.com
or
719-387-8115 US
Reserve in advance through Sandals and Skis
Email Steve Your Dates

New Cancun To Mahahual Airport Shuttle Service

SHUTTLE DETAILS:

Departs Friday and Saturday afternoons from Cancun Airport at 4:00 PM arriving in Mahahual around 8:00 PM
Returns Saturday and Sunday mornings from Mahahual at 8:00 AM arriving about 12:30
Service Begins September 26th 2014
Stops at Chedraui on the way South.
Sandals and Skis, (Steve Uhl from Tropicante Restaurant) in partnership with the Riviera Maya’s AGI Tours, is now the official booking entity for a new, direct airport shuttle service to Mahahual with weekend service starting September 26th, 2014. AGI’s fleet of vehicles range from small limos, to comfortable 16 person passenger shuttle buses, giving our service the flexibility in vehicle sizes to accommodate all size groups, as well as valet service for early or late arrivals. Clean, late model vehicles, with safe and professional drivers, make the 4 hour drive a nice place to snooze, read a book or just relax and enjoy the sites along the way.

Reservations are required and must be made through Sandals and Skis in advance. AGI Tour’s license requires they have a roster of all passengers and Sandals and Skis must present that a day before. Payment is not required for booking, but can be made the day of booking or any day prior to your trip, via Pay Pal. You can also pay the driver cash if you prefer, the day you arrive. Contact Steve Uhl to get your spot saved. If you are unsure on your travel days, ask Steve to help you coordinate your flight with the shuttle service before you buy your plane tickets. He is working on a Concierge service for the area. 719-387-8115 US

Thanks for reading,

Stewart Rogers USA-South Carolina

 

Latest News this Week from Mahahual

Once a week or so, I like to post the latest news and events going on in Mahahual.  Most of these newspapers and websites are in Spanish so I do my best to translate for the blog readers.  Sometimes some things are lost in traslation, so I try to do my best.

These articles below deal with a new Mayan city discovered on the Belize-Mexico border, new cruise line coming to Costa Maya Port, and Mahahual getting a sports dome in the future.

 

Discovered Mayan City in Quintana Roo

This Mayan city had its peak during the Classic Period.

This Mayan city had its peak during the Classic Period.

Hidden amongst the lush jungle vegetation distinguishes southeast of Mexico, INAH experts found the remains of Noh Kah, a prehispanic metropolis consisting of six architectural groups.
Archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) found hidden in the jungle of southern Quintana Roo an ancient Mayan city. His name is Noh Kah and is an urban area comprising more than 34 hectares, in which at least six groups of buildings erected between the Classic Period Early and Late Classic Period are located, as shown by the organization and form of the mounds.

The main finding of this archaeological site is the Paredón, a coated stone wall that runs up between 250 and 600 AD, from which hung lianas whose shape but warned the presence of a city “eaten by the jungle.” However, even this vestige denotes the importance of the site, it is a year after the first boom that over 1,500 years ago construction.

Noh Kah means “big city” and was proposed by Botes ejidatarios-Rivorosa name. It belongs to the area of the bank of Hondo River, adjacent to Belize, where huge areas like Kohunlich Dzibanché and extend. Therefore, this discovery could provide archaeologists new knowledge about the influence of the Kaan dynasty in this area, which is known too occupy other cities such as Calakmul.

Although further extension of this metropolis is unknown (whose study is difficult to mapping techniques tech due to the exuberance of the jungle), the settlement pattern is similar to other sites south of Quintana Roo that stand out for the nuclear separation cities area. Architectural groups are found far away by between 0.5 and 3 km, and were named Corozal, The Pich (thought it was the place where political power was exercised), The Paredón, The Pocito, Hop Na and the Twenty, where a pyramidal base is recognized.

Among the main features of Noh Kah is orographic use of the area allowed to convert terraced slopes. This is the same condition that hindered their discovery over a thousand years.

http://www.mexicodesconocido.com.mx/

 

Search Mahahual certification ‘Blue Flag’

Mahahual is seeking international certification “Blue Flag” that promotes sustainable development through strict criteria in the categories of water quality, environmental education and information, environmental management, safety and other services. According to the director of Ecology capital Commune, Gabriela del Rosario Santana Duarte, the Clean Water Committee of this resort in the municipality of Othon P. Blanco, had a meeting with Pronatura Mexico Mahahual AC running this program, order to know the guidelines to achieve this certification. At the meeting included members of the National Water Commission (Conagua), as well as representatives of associations of hotels, cabins, and restaurant in this town. “The meeting was intended to meet all the requirements requested by Pronatura to achieve this distinction, because there is interest in the federal zone dealers, mainly adjacent to the coastal town of Mahahual, because this beach would position in the eyes of world, “the city official. The municipal official said is expected to reach the “Blue Flag” certification, before concluding the present administration 2013-2016 capital’s City Hall, and thus elevate Mahahual. Mahahual is seeking international certification “Blue Flag” that promotes sustainable development through strict criteria in the categories of water quality, environmental education and information, environmental management, safety and other services. According to the director of Ecology capital Commune, Gabriela del Rosario Santana Duarte, the Clean Water Committee of this resort in the municipality of Othon P. Blanco, had a meeting with Pronatura Mexico Mahahual AC running this program, order to know the guidelines to achieve this certification. At the meeting included members of the National Water Commission (Conagua), as well as representatives of associations of hotels, cabins, and restaurant in this town. “The meeting was intended to meet all the requirements requested by Pronatura to achieve this distinction, because there is interest in the federal zone dealers, mainly adjacent to the coastal town of Mahahual, because this beach would position in the eyes of world, “the city official. The municipal official said is expected to reach the “Blue Flag” certification, before concluding the present administration 2013-2016 capital’s City Hall, and thus elevate Mahahual as a destination worldwide. Juan Palma (quequi.com.mx)

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The Return of Pullmantur

The recent announcement of the shipping company of Spanish origin, to return in 2015 to a Mexican route …
The recent announcement of the shipping company of Spanish origin, to return in 2015 to a Mexican route, speaks well of maritime prospects in the domestic market.

Pullmantur made ​​a good attempt in 2012 to launch tours of two routes, Maya Caribe, which included Cozumel, Costa Maya, Jamaica, Grand Cayman and Progress, and the Mexican Pacific to Acapulco, Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan, Manzanillo and Los Cabos.

With the explanation that sell boats, suspended tours.

With a resized optics, now also return with two options but the same area with the same boat: the Mayan Caribbean itineraries and Costa Maya will have weekly departures from Progreso, Yucatan and Cozumel, Quintana Roo, between June and August next year .

While it is a challenge, as it was in the past with their products promoted initially to Mexicans-for its price and they do not require visa estadounidense- stage seems appropriate with a booming travel industry.

With a more refined now -stroke strategy regions duraciones- everything seems to be ready for the return of Pullmantur more durable.

In her presentation to national media, the general manager of the firm’s Latin America Luis Vizcay, welcomed the return of the international brand to Mexico, highlighting the facilities that the governments of Quintana Roo and Yucatan are taking to the pitch.

The director general for Mexico Pullmantur ship Monarch explained that the firm will operate a total of 10 departures between June and August 2015, with two unique tours that allow more than 25 thousand cruise deeper into the history of the Mayan culture .

Users can also dive into the crystal clear waters of the Caribbean Sea and explore the famous Chinchorro coral bank, the second largest barrier reef in the world’s largest and extends over a thousand kilometers from the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, in addition to through Belize and Guatemala to the Bay Islands in Honduras.

Although there were other attempts in the past to offer cruises to the Mexican and visitors, Tropicana Cruises and Pacific Dream, for example, bet Pullmantur seems not so easy to maintain, as we saw after 2012.

But the experience of the shipping, its accuracy in measuring supply and demand as a corporate operation could represent this new crusade in the wind. Good news for those who like to travel this option, an experience at sea and destinations, sailing close to home.

More in http://www.tvradioriviera.com

Announce the construction of 2 new sports dome in the communities of La Union in Mahahual and Othon P. Blanco.
09/08/2014

Chetumal, Quintana Roo.- In intense work tour, Raymundo Federal Deputy King of Rosa, accompanied by the Mayor of Felipe Carrillo Puerto, Gabriel Carballo Tadeo, took the checkered flag to start the construction of 2 new sports dome in Noh-Bec communities and Tepich.

The federal legislature recognized the tireless work of Governor Roberto Borge Angulo, and thanks to your invaluable support proved possible to negotiate with the federation resources needed to build, announcing that this year’s work for the building of 2 new sports domes were initiated for communities in Mahahual and La Union in the municipality of Othon P. Blanco.

“This kind of work will have a major impact on communities, since not only are used for the development of sports, but also for social and cultural events, so its use is integral, under which are very requested by the general public, “said Raymond King of Rosa.

Finally, he reiterated the intention of the legislators quintanarroenses strengthen the efforts of Governor Roberto Borge Angulo to achieve an even higher budget authorized in previous years, to bring even more benefits to all. quintanarroenses.http://www.delcamponomedia,

Thanks for reading, and as you can see, lots of new and big things ahead for Mahahual.

Stewart Rogers USA-Canada