Marquesitas on the Malecon in Mahahual.

Marquesitas stand on malecon.

Marquesitas stand on malecon.

 

For the whole time I have been in Mahahual, I have seen these little carts around the malecon on special occasions and weekends.  They are Marquesitas carts, and they sell a unique treat.  I have been wanting to try one for years, but me being a diabetic, I was afraid I would go into a diabetic coma if I ever tried one.

I am staying on the malecon now, and I have noticed that there is always a long line at these carts, and they are always busy.  The other night there was a great smell coming from the malecon into the apartment here. So I went to investigate, and right underneath the balcony a guy had set up one of this carts and was doing business.

Right below my balcony on malecon, guy cooking away.

Right below my balcony on malecon, guy cooking away.

I wondered where nice smell came from.

I wondered where nice smell came from.

There was not much going on at the minute, so I sat and watched him operate for awhile.  They use some kind of waffle cone pancake batter it looks like to me.  They pour it, and cook it like a crepe I think.  They turn it upside down a couple of times and then they add the ingredients.  You can get almost anything in it.  Dutch cheese is the staple, but you can have chocolate, carmel, peanut butter, jam, cream cheese, sprinkles, and a bunch of other stuff.  I had mine with Hersey’s and carmel, with the Dutch cheese.  It cost 25 pesos, and I survived, and let me tell you it is sweet tasting, I could feel my blood sugar rising as I ate it.

Batter and pan they use to cook over propane.

Batter and pan they use to cook over propane.

Mine, chocolate and caramel.

Mine, chocolate and caramel.

Mexican crepe, I guess.

Mexican crepe, I guess.

My first Marquesita.

My first Marquesita.

The story goes that in 1910 Don Leopoldo Mena, an ice cream vendor by trade, had much success selling their delicious desserts in Merida, but even seemed to be a success in the winter down sales.

For extra profit they devised a strategy and decided to sell the wafers alone. The new product was well received and soon the sales increased.

The marquise is a delicious dessert that has become a tradition in the state of Yucatan, from 102 years ago, since in 1910 Don Leopoldo Mena, alias “Don Polo” and his son, who continued the tradition,  brought Izamal to Merida.

Leopoldo Mena, who lived in Izamal and was heladero by trade, decided to travel to the state capital to continue with this business and increase their sales.

Years later, his son, Vicente Mena Muñoz, better known as “Polito”, took over the family business of installed three new ice cream carts to try to increase sales.

The ice creams were very successful due to its great taste, but the cold seasons affected trade, so to counteract the low sales they began selling only 50 cents nacelles.

It was so successful marketing their nacelles which and had large orders for the new product, which came to be up to 1,000 pieces.

In the 1945 when the “Yucatecan crepes”  were born, based on the idea of being innovative with the car and began to make the cue with different fillings.

“Polito” went in search of the perfect stuffing, made tests with ground beef, caramel, honey and jam in different flavors, but were not accepted in the beginning, which is very contradictory, because today there are much more stuffed  orders.

Finally the arrival of Dutch cheese to the entity, now known as queso de bola, was accepted by the community Meridana for consumption.

The name given to this dessert is locally thanks to the success achieved by “Polito” in selling it in all sectors of the population.

It was therefore pleasing to citizens, and the daughters of a Marquis  constantly consumed so many, Mena Vicente Muñoz, alias “Polito” decided to call them “marquesitas”.

Currently this dessert can be found in parks, street corners, parks, parties and in any event.

If you plan to visit Mahahual you can not pass up the opportunity to try some  marquesitas.

On the weekends and holidays always a line.

On the weekends and holidays always a line.

Below is some more history I discovered, it is in English, and not as hard to read as the information I just translated.

Marquesita with Dutch cheese, the staple in Merida and the Yucatan.

Marquesita with Dutch cheese, the staple in Merida and the Yucatan.

Below is an article I came across from Merida, the birthplace of the “Margquesitas”.

“In 1945, thanks to the success of their cones without ice cream, Don Polo came up to give them a plus and added a singular filling. That day the marquesitas officially born, a dessert made ​​with sweet wafer mass of the palate contrasts with the salty taste of Dutch cheese of which are filled.

Perebory that this Yucatecan dessert was named as the favorite sweet daughters of a Marquis, devoted consumers of crunchy snack. History decreed that the names of those nobles were lost in the memory, but left their legacy, giving a nickname to one of the most representative sandwiches Yucatecan capital.

Today there are various fillings and cheese can also add them caramel, chocolate, honey, jams and so on. And all are successful.

If you came to Mérida or live there you can find them in the streets, outside churches, parks and events in the city every day and every hour.

The original, the Don Polo, you can find them on Calle 55 number 506, on the Paseo de las Fuentes colony located near Plaza Santiago. Another good place to enjoy and take advantage to stroll a Sunday night, is in the Parque de Las Americas where you can meet other snacks such as cakes and delicious esquites sucker.”

Thanks for reading,

Stewart Rogers USA-South Carolina

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